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"I'm finding it shocking and surprising the number of new people joining the community. Let me explain. I was diagnosed with AVN first in both knees back in 2005, over the next few years it was found in both hips and shoulders. I had never come across AVN before and felt like I was the only person with it, I was always having to explain to people what it was."
 
"Thankfully I found this website and community over a year ago and realised I was not the only one suffering with AVN, it has been such a help talking to fellow sufferers who understand what I am going through."
 
Text taken from a recent post in our community forum.

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If you are suffering from avascular necrosis AVN Osteonecrosis ON, or are close to someone that is, please consider joining our AVN Charity UK community. You will find many shared experiences about AVN and how it affects each of us differently, importantly there are also excellent success stories about the road to "Pain Free".
 
We also welcome any health professionals who are involved in any way with Avascular Necrosis AVN, please let us know how you think you can help.
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..../Cont. Pain and pain management. Page 4 of 4

B. Psychoactive drugs

i) Anticonvulsants are well acknowledged as being effective in the management of shooting pain, for example: trigeminal neuralgia and the shooting element of neurogenic pain, such as post-herpetic neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy and similar conditions. Carbamazepine appears to be the most effective drug although there is a higher incidence of side-effects than with Sodium Valproate. Recently Gabapentin and Lamotrigine are enjoying popularity, either as "add on" drugs, or as sole agents. Further drug development of these types of agents might produce useful efficacy in the future.

ii) Tricyclic antidepressants are one of the most commonly used analgesics in pain clinics. This is not for the specific antidepressant action, but is more associated with the activation of pain inhibitory pathways. This appears to be less of a feature with the tetracyclic agents, and has meant that their usage in chronic pain has as yet remained unproven. This is of course is disappointing as the side-effect profile is significantly better. The sedative effect of Amitriptyline can be harnessed to good usage by giving the tablet one or two hours before retiring, and it should not be used during the day.

From - The Pain Web

 

Analgesic pain management

In general, patients with pain can be given a trial of Paracetamol. An appropriate non-steroidal can be used if there is an inflammatory process, and continued if these are effective and if side-effects are minimal. The next optimal step in the analgesic ladder will be the use of agents like Tramadol, Dextropropoxyphene, or Dihydrocodeine, with long-acting preparations being ideal for chronic pain. At present, slow-release Tramadol would appear to be the most effective drug in chronic pain for this group of patients. If side-effects preclude its usage, one of the other agents can be considered.

Finally a small group of patients might be suitable for the use of opioids themselves.

In conjunction with this ladder, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants can be considered, for their specific and appropriate actions on shooting and burning pain, usually of neurogenic origin.

From - The Pain Web

 

Alternative pain management - AcupunctureAcupuncture for pain reliefAcupuncture for pain relief

For some sufferers acupuncture can bring some pain relief. Success is dependent on the patient being receptive to the needles and the knowledge and skill of the practitioner.

Reported results are that on the day of the acupuncture drowsiness is common, care should be taken with driving or operating any heavy machinery. The pain relief is reported as being observed the following day for one two or three days.

Clearly no two sufferers are the same, and no two practitioners are the same.

 



Last Updated on Thursday, 19 March 2015 22:02